At Open we identify and examine customer issues. At DNA we deliver on that thinking.

"We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them." - Albert Einstein

Convergence

What do U2, Joaquin Phoenix, Cricket and Jesus have in common?

Aaron Carson December 2009
resurrecting

Resurrecting a sick puppy

By Aaron Carson

New ways of delivering old things can be about pure innovation, or complete salvation. We asked Vincent Heeringa of HB Media (and new editor of Marketing Magazine) to tell us why he decided to take over an old, well-established publication, and how he and his team plan to save this masthead in what’s a pretty torrid, and rapidly changing publishing environment. DNA’s Aaron Carson asked the questions:

New ways of delivering old things can be about pure innovation, or complete salvation. We asked Vincent Heeringa of HB Media (and new editor of Marketing Magazine) to tell us why he decided to take over an old, well-established publication, and how he and his team plan to save this masthead in what’s a pretty torrid, and rapidly changing publishing environment. DNA’s Aaron Carson asked the questions:

AC: Aside from the obvious - what was the core problem you guys identified?

VH: The challenge with re-launching NZ Marketing was to honour the past and yet reposition the magazine for the future. On the one hand, the 23 year-old brand has a strong history, long time contributors and was potentially the number one property in the marketing/media space. But it had been left to wither on the vine due to lack of investment and care. The owners had actually gone into receivership by the time we got hold of it. Two additional problems were the rise of online media, especially blogs which were funnier, faster and more relevant to our audience. And that hoary old chestnut: the recession.

AC: How easily did the solutions you adopted evolve?

VH: We did four things, which at the time seemed like the right thing to do, but in retrospect look like pure genius (it’s always called genius when it works!). First we did a deal with the Marketing Association to secure the subscriber base and ensure this growing organisation didn’t become a competitor. Next we hired the best, most well-connected sales person we could find, who was the competition’s strongest asset. Third, we repositioned the brand through quality design and journalism. And fourth we launched a daily blog and email newsletter called Stoppress.co.nz to ensure we covered news.

AC: The first two issues have been great – but its early days. What are your measures of success?

VH: Sales, visitors, supporters and feedback. The re-launch has been a major success. Magazine advertising sales doubled on the first issue and continue to grow. Stoppress secured ten sponsors within three weeks and 30,000 page impressions in the first month. The TVNZ/NZ Marketing Awards held in October were profitable and fully sold out. And the feedback on the re-launch ranges from positive to euphoric.

AC: On reflection - are you good or lucky?

VH: We think there are two reasons for such early success. First, the market niche was unique and we’re lucky that the competition in that space is so mediocre - people were dying for an improvement, and we gave it to them. Second, old brands, when given the right amount of new love can really bounce back big-time. I’ve been involved in many start ups, all of which have been mildy successful, but re-launching NZ Marketing is making me rethink things. Perhaps rescues and re-launches are the thing to do!

 

Comments

Open season at DNA design :: StopPress :: Breaking news from New Zealand Marketing magazine 19 April 2011 at 8:24am

Look, there's an article on the rebirth of NZ Marketing magazine.

What do you think?